Archive for the Point of View Category

School Bus Fight

Posted in In The News, Point of View, School Buses, WLEX with tags , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2014 by Joan Graves

NOTE: This post is the opinion of Joan Graves and may or may not make up the entire or partial opinion of other Stand Up Clark County associates. 

schoolbusSadly, it’s not an uncommon event.  Out of the blue a fight starts on a school bus.  The driver of the bus must make immediate choices about how to handle the situation.  Recently, this transpired on a Clark County school bus traveling down Lexington Avenue.  Now the driver of the bus is under fire by the mother of one of the students involved.

My heart goes out to that mother.  It’s a sickening feeling to think of your child being in a fight.  The mother is questioning why the driver didn’t stop the bus immediately when the fight started.  As terrible as this is going to sound it is the absolute truth.  A bus load of students cannot have their safety jeopardized for the safety of one, even if that one was my own son.

Lexington Avenue is extremely busy.  Bringing that bus to a halt in the middle of the road with no warning to other drivers, puts not only the students on the bus at risk but also all other drivers around the bus.  And since people frequently walk on Lexington Avenue, pedestrians could have been injured should an accident have occurred.

When you encounter a school bus you expect it to put its stop sign out before it stops.  A stopped bus without its stop sign out will confuse drivers.  They won’t know whether to drive past it or stop.  They won’t know if students or getting off or if the bus has a problem.  Confused drivers cause accidents.

It’s unsafe for any car to suddenly stop in the road. That’s why police officers, pulling over a car for a traffic violation will have the driver move the car if they stop in an unsafe area and they have blue lights to signal them.  It’s also why, if there are no injuries, cars in an accident are told to move their cars out of the roadway.  The road is for moving vehicles not stopped ones.  In this case the bus driver acted appropriately.  However, it should be noted that if the bus driver saw the other student take off his shirt to fight she should have began searching for a place to pull over and perhaps she did.  I don’t know.

Now, for the real issue.  This fight was a 10th grader pounding on a 7th grader.  The problem is the alleged “parenting” of the 10th grade thug.  It takes a real spineless coward to pound on someone so much younger than him.  The thug’s parents should be brought up on charges and he should be completely banned from EVER riding on a Clark County school bus AND not be allowed to drive to school next year. ( See the video of the fight here. www.lex18.com/news/clark-county-bus-fight-caught-on-camera)

It’s time we start getting our schools thug proof.  If this kid wants to act like a thug then let’s treat him like one.  He should have every single extra-curricular activity removed from him, though doubtful he’s involved in anything except himself.  We cannot let people raise their bullies, take no responsibility for them then inflict them on the rest of us. I am sick of it and it’s time we deal with them with a very heavy hand. I encourage Superintendent Paul Christy to deal swiftly and mightily with this thug and boot him out of school for the rest of the year before he unleashes his unconstrained ire on another kid much younger than him and hurts him significantly.

Should this thug act again the school system is now liable because they know they know they have a loose cannon.  We cannot allow thugs and poor parenting to hijack the education and safety of all other students.

Stand Up Clark County and demand that Superintendent Paul Christy put an end to this thug’s brutal rein.

 

My Final Thought In Song For Tonight’s Meeting

Posted in Ashley Ritchie, Beth Griffith, BJ Swope, Board Meetings, Board Members, Board of Education (General), Deanna Wolfe, Debbie Fatkin, Dr. Michael Kuduk, Elaine Farris, Encouragement, Judy Hicks, Michael Kuduk, Michael McGowan, Point of View, Schools with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2014 by Joan Graves

keep-calm-and-love-toby-mac  I find the words I long to say to my community in the lyrics of a Toby Mac song.  I ache for our school board struggling to make decisions for the common good of everybody.  But my heart also aches for those, few as they may be, who will feel disappointed.  My prayer is that we all find a way to look beyond ourselves and go back to being the family of a community.  It was Winchester that taught me the meaning of community and forever changed my life.  I pray for us to once again become the family we were meant to be. After all, as Toby Mac says, “If we’re gotta start sometime why not now?”  Well, I’ll let Toby tell you the rest.  Just know I love you Clark County – ALL of you.

If you gotta start somewhere why not here? If you gotta start sometime why not now? If we gotta start somewhere I say here. If we gotta start sometime I say now. Through the fog there is hope in the distance, from cathedrals to third world missions. Love will fall to the earth like a crashing wave!

Tonight’s the night, for the sinners and the saints. Two worlds collide in a beautiful display. It’s all love tonight. When we step across the line, we can sail across the sea to a city with one King. A city on our knees

Tonight could last forever. WE ARE 1 CHOICE FROM TOGETHERas a family. We’re family.
Oh Tonight couldn’t last forever, we are one choice from together. You & me. It’s you and me.
IF WE GOTTA START SOMEWHERE WHY NOT HERE? IF WE GOTTA START SOMETIME WHY NOT NOW?
Stand Up Clark County & be that City on our Knees. A city willing to start here and now.

Facility Plan – What Are We Made Of?

Posted in Ashley Ritchie, Beth Griffith, BJ Swope, Board Meetings, Board Members, Board of Education (General), Deanna Wolfe, Debbie Fatkin, Encouragement, In The News, Judy Hicks, Michael Kuduk, Michael McGowan, Point of View, School Board Election 2012, Winchester Sun, WKYT with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2014 by Joan Graves

the-future Tomorrow night the Clark County School Board will vote on which facilities plan to accept.  Each plan has its strength and its weaknesses.  Each plan will make some pleased and leave others mad.  That can be said of any facility plan in any school board room in any town USA.  Clark County will no doubt have double the emotions simply because of all we have been through prior to this point.

Our facility plan drama began years ago with a highly controversial plan cloaked in accusations of wrongdoing and corruption.  From the moment the ink was quietly placed on the contract, the deal immediately began treading water in a pool of innuendo that immediately divided the community.

It had been quite some time since several of those school board members had been challenged so apparently they were under the misguided notion they could do as they pleased.  They simply did what they had always done.  They counted on the community’s outrage to play itself out and citizens to lose their steam.  When instead the community rallied together to fight for the common good of everybody then things changed.

behind clouds  The previous board’s inability then and even now to consider that they made terrible mistakes, disregarded community opinion, failed to weigh all the options or even begin to have the courage to stand up for the least of us, proves how grossly inadequate they were to represent the greatest of us.  Therefore, they brought shame and suspect upon all of their actions most notably the notorious facilities plan.  In an outrageous show of unification, the community made clear their disgust of being muted and voted out the old and in the new.  Now, we turn to a new era.  It’s a new time and opportunity.

This is the first time that any board member, with the exception of Judy Hicks, in this entire facilities plan drama, has taken time to consider all angles.  This board heard the community loud and clear.  They fought the state.  They have labored, sweat, prayed, talked, lost sleep over and contemplated beyond the realms any of us wish to consider.  This board has taken on what everyone wanted changed but few dared to tackle.  This board, with the exception of Judy Hicks, stepped up to the mound in the last inning with everything lined up against them and nothing going for them but an overwhelming desire to take one for the team because it’s the right thing to do.  Could you do it?  I couldn’t.  That’s why I didn’t run for the board.  images (18)

So, on this eve that changes everything I am asking you, Clark County, what are we made of?  This facilities plan is more than about a mere vote on metal and steel.  It’s a vote on the kind of people we are.  Are we selfish people willing to turn on one another if we don’t get our way?  Are we weak people willing to flaunt that our vote won over the plan that didn’t?  Or are we people with backbone, people who reach deep and know that regardless of what tomorrow holds it is a new era?  It’s a time of when we say all that is gone before, matters no more.  We have a board that will never again put our kids or their own reputations on the market to the highest bidder.  There is no more secret meetings, over-paid bureaucrats, over inflated egos or nauseating misuse of the media.

Life has shown us that more often than not to find what is keeping we must first sift through the rubbish.  To find a hidden treasure we must get dirty digging it from the dirt.  To find a diamond we have to travel the blackest coal shafts.  And if we want real gold then we have to spend hours on our knees shaking it from the imposters and fool’s gold surrounding it.  Finding what is real is important but what becomes more important is how do we treat what is authentic when we are not accustom to seeing it?  Now, is our time Clark County.  Stand up for your school board and say we respect your effort you have put into this decision making process – thank you for having the courage to do the job no one else wanted.

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High School Football Coaches Brawling On The Field.

Posted in In The News, National Stories, Point of View, Sports with tags , on September 6, 2013 by Joan Graves

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/sports/2013/09/03/hln-alabama-football-coach-brawl.hln.html

It’s easy to look at this video and think it would never happen to us. But don’t we all get caught up in the game? Check my FB page when a UK basketball game is on and you’ll see me ranting with the best of them.

It’s imperative that we draw a firm line for ourselves, our kids and our coaches. We cannot accept any behavior that strays beyond that line. We set ourselves up for this atrocious behavior when we have coaches angry at players in practice, parents angry at coaches during games and players angry at other players anytime. You may think the swirling animosity has no impact but it does. The distance between the anger in your head being displayed through your hands is a lot shorter than you think.

Stand Up Clark County then step back in the heat of the moment.

 

Not All Football Players Would Have Done This

Posted in Encouragement, In The News, National Stories, Point of View, Sports with tags , , , , , , , on August 28, 2013 by Joan Graves

footballplayers

Four William Patterson University football players entered a local store to find no cashier. They called out but no one answered. They selected their purchases, counted out the money, tossed it on the counter and left. Little did they know what was about to happen.

The players have received national exposure because they did the right thing. They could have stolen their items but did not. Somewhere along the way, a coach and/or parents taught these guys that when they take from another no one wins. They learned, no doubt, by example, that integrity is always more valuable than money or wins. These guys had opportunity but no motive. They knew there are ways to treat people and there are ways not to treat people. Now, they are enjoying the feeling of having a reputation of being men of honor in a sport that has far too high a crime rate. Being men of good character does not happen it is learned. And when it is displayed, it is celebrated and people never forget.

Read the story for yourself by clicking on the link below. Stand Up Clark County and teach our players to be men of honor. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/08/28/new-jersey-football-players-rewarded-for-honesty-after-paying-at-store-with-no/

 

Death Threats, Rivals, Ghosts & The Way To Make It Right.

Posted in George Rogers Clark, Point of View, Schools, Sports with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 23, 2013 by Joan Graves

My last post, “Beyond Friday Night”, generated heated responses from people calling themselves Tony and Jessica. Their remarks indicate they are friends with GRC Head Football Coach Steve Collins. They defended Collins vehemently and I actually applaud them for standing up for their friend. The manner in which they do it however, is highly questionable.

Tony and Jessica went to excessive lengths to hide their identities. They set up a dummy email account, which both used to access the comments section of the blog. Their IP addresses indicate they are in the same network. Which means Jessica and Tony either is the same person or is closely connected.

If you have followed this blog or read the Lexington Herald-Leader, you are aware of death threats made in the past. What you may not know is that a few weeks ago I received a threat, which basically said for me to stop Stand up Clark County or die. I was not impressed. People against Stand Up Clark County have long tried to silence me by using disgusting, perverted, and threatening remarks. The only common denominator is that each time the attack came after a post about the football program.

Let me be perfectly clear. I am in absolutely no way saying that Coach Collins or his staff is responsible for death threats or verbal attacks. What I am saying is that it is the topic of Collins’ football program that triggers the venom. I have no idea if it’s a coach, fan, parent, player, cheerleader, or community member launching the assaults. What I do know is whoever it is they are extremely passionate about Collins’ football program.

From my point of view, this is what I see. Paul Columbia’s firing was not the fault of Coach Collins, though Collins and his staff like to use that as an excuse for their shortcomings. Collins took a job he knew was in drowning in controversy so none of this is a surprise to him. What is surprising to us, however, is that Collins has invested more in our rival Montgomery County than he ever has in the community of Clark County. He made the decision early on to place himself in opposition of the majority of the community. Little did he know the previous board of education would fall and the superintendent who hired him retire, leaving him at the mercy of the very people he has shunned.

One of the first things Collins did, as football coach was take business away from Clark County’s long time small business staple, South Main Grocery. He immediately ended the team’s tradition of having breakfast there. Many saw that move as self-serving because Collins failed to realize the importance of tradition in the midst of turmoil. Since then, Collins’s program has been embroiled in controversy surrounding the treatment of players.

Collins has failed to ever address the concerns or even as much as attempt to interact with the community. Instead, he opted to take money from our small businesses while investing in Montgomery County golf scrambles. Collins appears to be heavily involved in the community in which he lives but not in the community who pays his salary or in which the kids he interacts with live. If Collins does not produce well-rounded individuals, what concern is it of his? Clark County is a paycheck not an investment.

Collins’s divided mind has cost him greatly but us even more so. While he spent his time trying to defeat the ghost of Paul Columbia, his team logged one of the worst seasons on record. Now, rather than focus on the players and how to make them successful he has opted instead to spend his time and energy into making PR rounds for an Astro Turf. When what we really need is a leader.

Clark County takes pride in our heritage and sense of community. We are not like other counties. We still stand for “old fashioned values”. We do not want new flashy things that spend our money but produce nothing. We prefer to invest in people not things.

We do not want to oppose Coach Collins but we must protect our core values. We have an obligation to the future of our kids. Therefore, we must insist Coach Collins invest in Clark County, speak out against those creating turmoil and crime in his name and begin building a bridge that will improve the lives of all Clark Contains.

Stand Up Clark County for all we are, have been and will be.

Beyond Friday Night

Posted in In The News, National Stories, Point of View, Sports with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 20, 2013 by Joan Graves

GRC Football Coach Steve Collins has recently been requesting media interviews regarding money for an AstroTurf football field. I was dismayed to hear Collins say, that a new field would, “mean a lot” to the players and that “was the most important thing.” That type of statement can project the image that our school system centers on football rather than education.

By investing so much time and energy into obtaining the field, Collins is making it clear an Astro Turf field is a priority for him and the community has a major hand in whether his priority becomes our reality. Players naturally adopt the priorities of their coach. In this case they may cast a negative eye on a community they have been deceived into thinking is against them.

The football program is very valuable and we need to invest in it as we can. Nevertheless, the program is not nearly as important as the players themselves and their peers. It is the responsibility of coaches to graduate balanced, fully educated players with a strong sense of community. That recipe is what transforms a student into a successful adult. What the current football team is receiving is far from what they are due. They deserve more than adults who strive to pit them against their community.

The nightly news is filled with the tragic outcomes of kids being taught their wants and needs are paramount over everyone else’s. The Steubenville High School rape case gained national attention but it was not a lone case. Nor was it something that happened unexpectedly. The situation grew naturally out of an environment of players believing football is the most important thing and having adults cover up their crimes and infractions, depriving them of the positive life experiences that come with accountability.

The mental grooming in Steubenville took place over a period of years. Steubenville was like a cancer tumor growing quietly within while the symptoms were covered up. By the time it was discovered, the roots were so deep it threatened the very life that maintained it. The players’ sense of entitlement was so complete they failed to see the repeated rape of a drunken, passed out girl a problem. In a sick and perverted video frenzy, they documented and shared their crimes.

The few players who knew rape was wrong turned away or gave a half-hearted effort to stop it. Parents try to instill a morale sense in kids but frequently their kids spend the majority of their time with people opposed to those morals or at the very least ignore them. The negative input overrode the positive parenting. Students testified in court, that the high school focused on football and the rules that applied to the general student population did not include football players. Football players had a staff of coaches and others willing to cheat, lie and cover-up crimes for the sake of a win.

Is that what we want for our kids? Do we want to be the next Steubenville? Do you want your kid to be the next to commit suicide over his/her treatment at school or be the next rape statistic? Cases like this happen in Anytown USA. The difference between us in them is that we cling to our fundamental morale foundation.  Steubenville adults taught those kids they did not have to take responsibility. That is a very poisonous lie. Responsibility will come. The only question is, when? Two players sit in prison, for all of their life branded a sex offender while the adults who traded their future for a Friday night win go scot-free.

Clark County has a strong sense of community. When tragedy strikes, we pull together as a single powerful force. Many don’t understand our “small town ways”, including the small towns that surround us. What may work in another county will fail here and vice versa. That is why we should always promote the hiring of Clark County citizens over outsiders. It is important to explore new ideas and ways of doing things. But if those ideas are in direct opposition of our community’s core values then we must stand against them. Clark County has consistently focused on turning out graduates who have learned the importance denying self to help another. We have seen previous GRC students travel hours on a brutally cold winter night just to give a two-minute speech about how a Clark County educator made a positive life changing impact on his life. No one forced them to come. They came because the values they learned taught ran so deep they simply could not do anything else. That is truly the most important thing.

I agree with Collins that we have endured a season of change. For that reason alone, we must demand coaches cater to the needs of the whole child rather than just those of a player. Tragedies such as Steubenville occur when we stop viewing players as evolving individuals who need strong ethical guidance to achieve their full potential.

We need a community supportive of the football program and a football program involved in the community. We want our players hungry for a win but we want them starving to positively impact their community. When the whole child is attended to, games are won, students become high achievers, and communities prosper. We can climb out of this pit of controversy, celebrate great wins in sports, bridge achievement gaps and soar to the top rather than continue to dangle at the bottom of the educational food chain. However, it will only happen when we start looking beyond Friday night.

Stand Up Clark County because life is more than a game.

NOTE: This blog post represents the views and opinions of Joan Graves.

Peeing Under Construction

Posted in George Rogers Clark, Point of View, Schools with tags , , , , , , , , on August 14, 2013 by Joan Graves

Students at GRC are required to wear bright orange construction vests if they leave class to go to the restroom. I am torn between laughter and shock. It is bad enough to think a single person’s brain neurons could so disturbingly malfunction that this would actually seem like a good idea, but this is the action of more than one person. Not to mention I am pretty sure shockingly bright orange vests with reflector strips are restricted under the dress code rules. Well, maybe not. It’s unlikely it ever occurred to anyone to forbid the wearing of construction gear.

School supply lists include hand sanitizer as a means to reduce the spread of germs. But somewhere in the war on germs sharing glowing vests became acceptable. And what about all those letters are sent home every year advising kids NOT to share clothing in order to reduce the spread of lice, the flu and even the potentially deadly MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aurous)?

Then there are all the health risks that come from resisting the urge to…..ummm…..pee all over everything. Isn’t someone in a fancy new science classroom teaching about how the bladder is a muscle and repercussions of stretching it? Do they know what happens when the bladder and urinary system is mistreated? Isn’t there a health class that explains how voiding dysfunction (a fancy term for not going potty) can lead to very serious life-long conditions such as urinary retention?

When Dalton was five, he constantly had to go to the bathroom. We would get ready to leave the house, make him go pee and sternly tell him we absolutely were not going to stop for him to go to the bathroom. Without fail 15 minutes into the trip and he had to pee. We thought it was behavior. We had not a single warning sign there was a dangerous, under-lying condition that had steadily been building for years; until the pain came.

You know that thing a doctor does when he places two fingers on your kid’s tummy and taps with another? As an EMT (emergency medical technician), I learned the typical sounds a body makes when tapped like that. So, when I heard the sickening thud during Dalton’s exam I knew something was bad wrong. It was so distinct his doctor whipped around and looked at me. We did not need words between us to know something was very, VERY wrong.

A whirlwind of tests later, we learned Dalton’s kidney had been dangerously expanding from an inability to empty his bladder. At five, his bladder was three times the size of an adult’s. The specialist explained that even a slight fall could have been catastrophic and we had no inkling. Fortunately, surgery corrected the problem but he is still very susceptible to any disease involving the urinary system.

My best friend, Janeen, had no inclination she also had a “sleeping” kidney condition. Though she had a few urinary tract infections, she was in good health. While undergoing fertility testing, it was discovered she had one kidney. She had no idea the stress her other kidney was enduring by doing the work of two.

My son DJ was in the hospital thankfully when the effects of not urinating hit him. His urine backed so far up into his kidney that an ultra sound technician alerted an urologist that there was an emergency. The doctor ran past me without ever slowing down while spouting our “stat” orders and scaring me to death with words like kidney failure. In his case, we did know there was a problem but our concerns were dismissed. We were told that when he had to go bad enough DJ would go. Their mistake could have cost us DJ’s life.

Wow, that was a turn from fun to scary wasn’t it? I do not say these things to incite fear but rather spread education. Sometimes what we think is minor can be huge. Most kids are not going to suffer these types of problems and some will use a bathroom break as a means to avoid class and do who knows what. The point is that educators teach not doctor. Furthermore, medical privacy laws make it possible for a student to go to the restroom without providing specific reason and in defiance of all school policies. All school officials can do is require a doctor’s note. However, I am thinking that won’t be a problem once the doctor hears about all the threats to the kid’s health from sharing the vest.

As always I recommend, you attend school board meetings or contact your board representative to voice your concerns. I can’t imagine that with all the HIPPA regulations, threats of lawsuits, questions of civil rights and parental pressure, the “Peeing under construction” rule will stand. But then again, I would have never imagined I’d be blogging about peeing in orange vests. However, I do have an idea. As long as students have to wear the orange vests, I think those who agree with or enforce the rule should have to wear this.

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Since a leader is always responsible for decisions made on his watch and the fact that they should always be easily identified I think Principal David Bolen should wear this. 

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Stand Up Clark County for the prevention of disease, humiliation, and utter stupidity.

The remarks in this blog are the expression of opinion.  

 

Principal Uses His Power To Get Playing Time For His Son

Posted in Board of Education (General), In The News, Point of View, Sports with tags , , , , , , , on June 18, 2013 by Joan Graves

The Jessamine County Board of Education is currently hearing the contested demotion case of West Jessamine High School Principal, Ed Jones. Jones is accused of interfering in his son’s school athletics over a period of several years. The Jessamine Journal reports that a teacher alleges Jones told her he was “unhappy with the baseball team and his son’s playing time”. The teacher, Denise Hamilton, is married to the coach in question. She described the severe emotional toll of having to cope with what she believed was unethical behavior while trying to maintain her job. “That is my supervisor; he’s in charge of my professional career, and I’ve had outstanding evaluations for 10 years,” I take pride in what I do.’ When referring to an incident where Jones allegedly was angry over his son is playing time, Hamilton said; “I had never seen such rage.” The Journal goes on to state Hamilton testified she was “afraid for her professional career to the point of physical illness.”

Other employees reported Jones had frequently been heard screaming and yelling at employees and coaches. Others allege Jones made remarks such as “He better put my son in” and, “You don’t know who you’re messing with”.

Typically, in these situations a student with a relative abusing educational power gains an over-inflated sense of entitlement. If no one steps up to contest the ethical erosion, the student will see the benefits of continuing the family-trait of narcissism. They fail to realize that their lack of empathy increases the chance of future criminal behavior.

Sadly, this story is playing out in various ways in school districts across America. The very place that should be preparing our kids for a better future has become a breeding-ground for narcissist personality disorder. Compounding the issue are the educators whose goal is to survive so they silently wait for the coming year so they can pass the problem to the next person. That may be getting rid of the problem for one person but it does nothing to improve or enrich the life of the student.

We can compare what happens in our schools to a crocheting project. When you begin crocheting an afghan, it does not look like much. The pattern we hope we are creating remains hidden as one loop is weaved into the next. It is only after a significant amount of time, money and effort has been invested that we begin to see the pattern is not at all, what we expected. Then we must decide whether we should rip it out and begin again or attempt to cover up the parts we do not like.

A kid who depends on someone else’s power to get him through life will not have the first clue what to do when that power fails him. And make no mistake about it, that day will come. The only question is are we going to be people willing to rip out what’s wrong and start over while we have a chance to make a difference, or are we going watch the them self-destruction years later, unraveling from the inside out?

Stand Up Clark County and embrace the hobby of crocheting.

Opportunity To Address Clark County Education Crisis With Frankfort

Posted in In The News, Point of View with tags , , , , , on May 29, 2013 by Joan Graves

Barr

KY Education Commissioner Terry Holliday may have chosen to put education in Clark County at risk, but we have not. Holliday’s opinion of the crisis we are facing thankfully is not the majority in Frankfort. There are others with significantly greater impact and power who support the community as we fight on.

Tomorrow morning Rep. Andy Barr will be at Cairn Coffee House from 8:00 am until 9:30 pm. Some politicians have traded the trust we placed in them for personal or political favors. If we want Frankfort to stop playing Russian roulette with our kids’ future, we must say so.

Barr was campaigning at the Pioneer Festival in September. I knew his name but that was it. I had no idea what his platform was. He got my attention because he was the only politician there who was circulating in the crowd. While other politicians at the festival stood at their booths waiting for us to come to them, Barr was seeking us. Now, he comes to us again.

We have an opportunity to take our concerns to a politician willing to listen and act on our behalf. We cannot waste it. Stand Up Clark County and see Rep. Andy Barr at the Cairn Coffeehouse.